In the winter time the actor Hilmar works as a director in the theaters in and around Reykjavik but in the summertime he travels to Vopnafjörður and guides on the Selá and Hofsá rivers. An outdoor person: he likes to fish, hunt and walk his dog. A true gentleman, Hilmar works hard for his clients in order to maximise their experience on our stunning rivers.

Nature

Goose eggs on the Miðfjarðará river

The River Ecosystem

The Six River Project’s conservation programme is primarily aimed at the protection of the North Atlantic salmon. We hope however that as a consequence of the improvement in the rivers’ ecosystems that other fauna will benefit from the enhancement and protection of the local environment.

A walk along the banks of any of our rivers or along the nearby coastline will yield an abundance of life. The illustrations below give you a flavour of some of the birds, mammals and plant life that are particularly indigenous to this part of Iceland.

Birds

Iceland is a mecca for ornithologists and you will find many varieties of sea birds, waders, water birds and land birds at the Six Rivers Project.

Flora

Much of the northern part of Iceland is marshy or tundra, with the vegetation being predominantly mosses, lichens and sedges. Typical is Iceland moss, a lichen which grows abundantly forming mats on the tundras and mountain slopes and which can provide “famine food” in times of necessity.

Mountain Avens (Dryas Octopetala)

Mountain Avens

Dryas Octopetala CLASSIFICATION
Family
Rosaceae
Order
Rosales
Class
Rosids
Phylum
Eudicots
Kingdom
Plantae
Angelica (Angelica Archangelica)

Angelica

Angelica Archangelica CLASSIFICATION
Family
Apiaceae
Order
Apiales
Class
Asterids
Phylum
Eudicots Asterids
Kingdom
Plantae
Artic Thyme (Thymus Praecox Arcticus)

Arctic Thyme

Thymus Praecox Arcticus CLASSIFICATION
Family
Lamiaceae
Order
Lamiales
Class
Asterids
Phylum
Chordata
Kingdom
Plantae

Land Mammals

There are not many land mammals found naturally on Iceland, nearly everything has been introduced through the centuries by man. Some exceptions include the arctic fox and polar bear although these are only rarely sighted. Perhaps one of the worst examples of human interference was the introduction of mink farming to Iceland in the 1930s. Mink escaped from the farms, bred successfully in the wild and became a major threat to birdlife on Iceland. Government sponsored hunting has capped numbers: but the mink remains a problem that Iceland’s fragile eco-system could do without.

Arctic Fox (Vulpes lagopus)

Arctic Fox

Vulpes lagopus CLASSIFICATION
Family
Canidae
Order
Carnivora
Class
Mammalia
Phylum
Chordata
Kingdom
Animalia
Eurasian Mink (Vulpes lagopus)

Eurasian Mink

Mustela lutreola CLASSIFICATION
Family
Mustelidae
Order
Carnivora
Class
Mammalia
Phylum
Chordata
Kingdom
Animalia
Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus)

Polar Bear

Ursus maritimus CLASSIFICATION
Family
Ursidae
Order
Carnivora
Class
Mammalia
Phylum
Chordata
Kingdom
Animalia

Marine Mammals

We can arrange whale watching trips during your stay where you might encounter humpback and killer whales, as well as seals. Poised on the edge of Skjálfandi Bay in North East Iceland, the fishing town of Húsavík is recognised as one of the best whale watching locations in the world and is certainly the best place to spot whales in Iceland.

Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)

Blue Whale

Balaenoptera musculus CLASSIFICATION
Family
Balaenopteridae
Order
Artiodactyla
Class
Mammalia
Phylum
Chordata
Kingdom
Animalia
Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae)

Humpback Whale

Megaptera novaeangliae CLASSIFICATION
Family
Balaenopteridae
Order
Artiodactyla
Class
Mammalia
Phylum
Chordata
Kingdom
Animalia
Minke Whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata)

Minke Whale

Balaenoptera acutorostrata CLASSIFICATION
Family
UrsidaeBalaenopteridae
Order
Artiodactyla
Class
Mammalia
Phylum
Chordata
Kingdom
Animalia